A Wizard Did It

dqdbpb:

Roadmap to Immortality by Maria Konovalenko

legit-writing-tips:

When you’re trying to write dialogue, remember that each character will have his/her own motivations and will likely have different end goals for the way they want a conversation to go. This is true whether your characters are strategizing a plan to take down the Evil…

robofists-revenge:

I once went to the Renaissance Fair dressed as Marty McFly, and nobody got the joke.

That will forever be one of the most disappointing moments in my life.

queerdontfear:

I’m sorry, but if lesbians can control themselves in a girls only changing room with ass naked woman waltzing around. Then I figure men should be able to control them selves with clothed girls walking down the street. Just a thought.

micdotcom:

Woman fires back at misogynistic troll in the best way possible 
exulansis

dictionaryofobscuresorrows:

n. the tendency to give up trying to talk about an experience because people are unable to relate to it—whether through envy or pity or simple foreignness—which allows it to drift away from the rest of your life story, until the memory itself feels out of place, almost mythical, wandering restlessly in the fog, no longer even looking for a place to land.

writeworld:

Writers often spend a great deal of time developing their protagonists only to neglect their villains. However, a well-developed villain is just as important as the protagonist to a story’s success.

A villain who is too evil or not evil enough, a villain who is one-dimensional or a villain lacking clear motivation are some of the problems you might run into while trying to develop a character who will oppose your protagonist. A great villain can sometimes be the difference between a novel that is good and a novel that is great. Here are some questions you can ask yourself in creating that great villain.

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